Please!!! Don't Abuse The Animals

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Pests to Your Pets

FLEAS AND TICKS

Both Dogs and Cats are at risk for fleas and ticks.

Fleas and ticks can make your puppy or dog miserable. They live on your dog, enjoying a constant source of food, warmth and protection. The symptoms often include a lot of scratching, red skin and inflamed areas, and you must take both corrective and preventative action.

Dangers of Fleas and Ticks

  • Flea saliva is an allergen for many dogs and cats. When a flea bites, the saliva irritates a dog's or cat's skin, causing him/her to scratch, bite and chew - which can lead to sores and an infection.

  • Ticks bite too, sucking blood out through the skin. Not only do they itch, they can carry diseases that may be transmitted to your dog.

In places with cold winters, fleas and ticks are a seasonal problem, with peaks in the summer and fall. In some warm states, it's a year-round battle.

What You Can Do

Controlling fleas and ticks is the goal. To do that, you must understand how fleas and ticks live. The latest research suggests that fleas spend most of their time on your pet, but are constantly shedding their eggs in the house and yard. Ticks live on and off of your dog or cat. This provides a continuous source of re-infestation.

That means you need to treat both your dog or cat and the surrounding environment.

  • Treating your dog or cat: Powders, sprays, shampoos and dips are your best weapons. Be careful, though. Read and follow label instructions.

  • Veterinarians now have some effective new treatment options for your pet including oral and topical medications.

  • Flea collars provide some control. However, some dogs may be allergic to them.

  • Treating the inside of your house: Thorough cleaning and vacuuming may do the trick. However, it might also take sprays and foggers.

  • Treating the outside: Sprays and foggers. Chemicals for treating the house and yard are available over-the-counter, as well as from veterinarians.

Always check with your veterinarian first. Combinations of more than one flea or tick treatment can sometimes actually be harmful to your dog. Your veterinarian will know how to avoid those combinations.

When all else fails, call a professional exterminator. Your veterinarian can be of help, too. He or she may prescribe small amounts of corticosteroids to provide some relief.

 
 

[ About Author | Missy's Story | Digby's Story | Joey's Story ]

[ Morkey's Story | Snow Ball's Story | Mid Night's Story | Frosty's Story ]
[ Fluffy's Story | Cuddles Story | Lucky's Story | Pet Memorial ]
[ Types of Abuse | Prevention | Rights & Welfare | Spay & Neuter ]

[ Questionnaire | Puppy Mills | Cat Care | Dog Care | Dog Training ]

[ Pests to Pets | Charities | Moments in Life | Web Site Journal ]

[ Favorite Links | Link to Me! | Legal Info | Contact Me! | GuestBook ]

[ Site Map | Home | Awards Won | Awards Program ]

 

All Material is Written by Anita Eberline
No part may be reproduced without prior permission by Anita Eberline.


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